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[PLEASE READ] ZClassic > BitcoinPrivate Snapshot/Fork Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) MEGATHREAD 2.0

I’ve been seeing a lot of repeated questions being asked every day so an updated FAQ/Megathread to address all of those questions will be detailed here. If we are missing something, please feel free to let us know and we will add it. We will try to edit this posting as more information becomes available.
Keep in mind the official Bitcoin Private Support portal has now been launched. We have a live chat feature to chat with support, as well as a knowledge base. Please visit the portal at support.btcprivate.org and use the knowledge base’s search function before asking other users.
Snapshot/Fork FAQ
Claiming BTCP Coins
BTCP/ZCL Exchange and Wallet Support
Donations and Contributions program
BTCP Mining
Wallet Troubleshooting
Miscellaneous/BTCP Project Questions
Donate towards the BTCP contribution team, Your donations are 100% voluntary but they are much appreciated!
ZCL: t1gsePJZ6ojJYygj3PWMGJfojPUoMd5AVfU
BTC: 14Xmfm9jf4h1h4RXZBQCFK6i4LWibqWVPu
LTC: LNYzDrUeX6PSecu4sL4eZkuJGaSXnf8GUH
BTCP Related Important Links
For the official list of links from the BTCP Github, refer to the repo.
Just a re-iteration, the BTCP team has launched the support portal offering resources ranging from live support from our teams, as well as a knowledge base that is constantly being updated. https://support.btcprivate.org Again, please feel free to let me know any questions that’s not currently listed above and we will do our best to answer and include it in the megathread.
submitted by BestServerNA to ZClassic [link] [comments]

[PLEASE READ] ZClassic > BitcoinPrivate Snapshot/Fork Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) MEGATHREAD 2.0

I’ve been seeing a lot of repeated questions being asked every day so an updated FAQ/Megathread to address all of those questions will be detailed here. If we are missing something, please feel free to let us know and we will add it. We will try to edit this posting as more information becomes available.
Keep in mind the official Bitcoin Private Support portal has now been launched. We have a live chat feature to chat with support, as well as a knowledge base. Please visit the portal at support.btcprivate.org and use the knowledge base’s search function before asking other users.
Snapshot/Fork FAQ
Claiming BTCP Coins
BTCP/ZCL Exchange and Wallet Support
Donations and Contributions program
BTCP Mining
Wallet Troubleshooting
Miscellaneous/BTCP Project Questions
Donate towards the BTCP contribution team, Your donations are 100% voluntary but they are much appreciated!
ZCL: t1gsePJZ6ojJYygj3PWMGJfojPUoMd5AVfU
BTC: 14Xmfm9jf4h1h4RXZBQCFK6i4LWibqWVPu
LTC: LNYzDrUeX6PSecu4sL4eZkuJGaSXnf8GUH
BTCP Related Important Links
For the official list of links from the BTCP Github, refer to the repo.
Just a re-iteration, the BTCP team has launched the support portal offering resources ranging from live support from our teams, as well as a knowledge base that is constantly being updated. https://support.btcprivate.org Again, please feel free to let me know any questions that’s not currently listed above and we will do our best to answer and include it in the megathread.
submitted by BestServerNA to BitcoinPrivate [link] [comments]

Blockchain Wallets

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What a Blockchain Wallet is? What is its purpose?
Find the answer after reading this article.
Public/Private Key
The public key is the digital code you give to someone that wants to transfer ownership of a unit of cryptocurrency to you; and a private key is what you need to be able to unlock your own wallet to transfer a unit of a cryptocurrency to someone else. The encoding of information within a wallet is done by the private and public keys. That is the main component of the encryption that maintains the security of the wallet. Both keys function in simultaneous encryption systems called symmetric and asymmetric encryption. The former, alternatively known as private key encryption, makes use of the same key for encryption and decryption. The latter, asymmetric encryption, utilizes two keys, the public and private key, wherein a message-sender encrypts the message with the public key, and the recipient decodes it with their private key. The public key uses asymmetric algorithms that convert messages into an unreadable format. A person who possesses a public key can encrypt the message for a specific receiver.
Accessing wallets
Methods of wallet access vary depending on the type of wallet being used. Various types of currency wallets on an exchange will normally be accessed via the exchange’s entrance portal, normally involving a combination of a username/password and optionally, 2FA (Two factor authentication, which we explain in more detail later). Whereas hardware wallets need to be connected to an internet enabled device, and then have a pin code entered manually by the user in possession of the hardware wallet in order for access to be gained. Phone wallets are accessed through the device on which the wallet application has been downloaded. Ordinarily, a passcode and/or security pattern must be entered before entry is granted, in addition to 2FA for withdrawals.
Satoshi Nakamoto built the Satoshi client which evolved into Bitcoin in 2009. This software allowed users to create wallets and send money to other addresses. However, it proved to be a nightmarish user experience, with many transactions being sent to incorrect addresses and private keys being lost. The MtGox (Magic the Gathering Online exchange, named after the original intended use of the exchange) incident, which will be covered in greater detail later, serves as a reminder of the dangers present in the cryptosphere regarding security, and the need to constantly upgrade your defenses against all potential hacks. The resulting loss of 850k BTC is a still unresolved problem, weighing heavily on the victims and the markets at large. This caused a huge push for a constantly evolving and improving focus on security. Exchanges that developed later, and are thus considered more legitimate and secure, such as Gemini and Coinbase, put a much greater emphasis on vigilance as a direct result of the MtGox hacking incident. We also saw the evolution of wallet security into the physical realm with the creation of hardware wallets, most notable among them the Ledger and Trezor wallets.
Types of Wallets & Storage Methods
The simplest way to sift through the dozens of cryptocurrency storage methods available today, is to divide them up into digital and non-digital, software and hardware wallets. There are also less commonly used methods of storage of private keys, like paper wallets and brain wallets. We will examine them all at least briefly, because in the course of your interaction with cryptocurrencies and Blockchain technology, it is essential to master all the different types of hardware and software wallets. Another distinction must be made between hot wallets and cold wallets. A hot wallet is one that is connected to the internet, and a cold wallet is one that is not. Fun fact: The level below cold storage, deep cold storage has just recently been implemented by the Regal RA DMCC, a subsidiary of an internationally renowned gold trading company licensed in the Middle East. After having been granted a crypto trading license, Regal RA launched their “deep cold” storage solution for traders and investors, which offers the ability to store crypto assets in vaults deep below the Almas Tower in Dubai. This storage method is so secure that at no point is the vault connected to a network or the internet; meaning the owners of the assets can be sure that the private keys are known only to the rightful owners.
Lets take a quick look at specific features and functionality of varieties of crypto wallets. Software wallets: wallet applications installed on a laptop, desktop, phone or tablet. Web Wallets: A hot wallet by definition. Web Wallets are accessible through the web browser on your phone or computer. The most important feature to recognize about any kind of web wallet, is that the private keys are held and managed by a trusted third party. MyEtherWallet is the most commonly used non-exchange web wallet, but it can only be used to store Ethereum and ERC-20 tokens.
Though the avenue of access to MEW is through the web, it is not strictly speaking a web wallet, though this label will suffice for the time being. The MEW site gives you the ability to create a new wallet so you can store your ETH yourself. All the data is created and stored on your CPU rather than their servers. This makes MEW a hybrid kind of web wallet and desktop wallet. Exchange Wallets: A form of Web Wallet contained within an exchange. An exchange will hold a wallet for each individual variety of cryptocurrency you hold on that exchange. Desktop Wallets: A software program downloaded onto your computer or tablet hard drive that usually holds only one kind of cryptocurrency. The Nano Wallet (Formerly Raiwallet) and Neon wallet for storage of NEO and NEP-5 tokens are notable examples of desktop wallets Phone Wallets: These are apps downloaded onto a mobile phone that function in the same manner as a desktop wallet, but actually can hold many different kinds of cryptocurrency. The Eidoo Wallet for storing Ethereum and its associated tokens and Blockchain Wallet which currently is configured to hold BTC, ETH and Bitcoin Cash, are some of the most widely used examples.
Hardware wallets — LedgeTrezoAlternatives
Hardware wallets are basically physical pathways and keys to the unique location of your crypto assets on the Blockchain. These are thought to be more secure than any variety of web wallet because the private key is stored within your own hard wallet, an actual physical device. This forcibly removes the risk your online wallet, or your exchange counter party, might be hacked in the same manner as MtGox. In hardware wallet transactions, the wallet’s API creates the transaction when a user requests a payment. An API is a set of functions that facilitates the creation of applications that interact and access features or data of an operating system. The hardware then signs the transaction, and produces a public key, which is given to the network. This means the signing keys never leave the hardware wallet. The user must both enter a personal identification number and physically press buttons on the hardware wallet in order to gain access to their Blockchain wallet address through this method, and do the same to initiate transfers.
Paper Wallets
Possibly the safest form of cryptocurrency storage in terms of avoiding hacking, Paper Wallets are an offline form of crypto storage that is free to set up, and probably the most secure way for users, from beginners to experts, to hold on to their crypto assets. To say it simply, paper wallets are an offline cold storage method of storing cryptocurrency. This includes actually printing out your public and private keys on a piece of paper, which you then store and save in a secure place. The keys are printed in the form of QR codes which you can scan in the future for all your transactions. The reason why it is so safe is that it gives complete control to you, the user. You do not need to worry about the security or condition of a piece of hardware, nor do you have to worry about hackers on the net, or any other piece of malware. You just need to take care of one piece of paper!
Real World Historical Examples of Different Wallet Types
Web Wallet: Blockchain.info Brief mechanism & Security Blockchain.info is both a cryptocurrency wallet, supporting Bitcoin, Ethereum and Bitcoin cash, and also a block explorer service. The wallet service provided by blockchain.info has both a Web Wallet, and mobile phone application wallet, both of which involve signing up with an email address, and both have downloadable private keys. Two Factor Authentication is enabled for transfers from the web and mobile wallets, as well as email confirmation (as with most withdrawals from exchanges). Phone Wallet: Eidoo The Eidoo wallet is a multi-currency mobile phone app wallet for storage of Ethereum and ERC-20 tokens. The security level is the standard phone wallet level of email registration, confirmation, password login, and 2 factor authentication used in all transfers out. You may find small volumes of different varieties of cryptocurrencies randomly turning up in your Eidoo wallet address. Certain projects have deals with individual wallets to allow for “airdrops” to take place of a particular token into the wallet, without the consent of the wallet holder. There is no need to be alarmed, and the security of the wallet is not in any way compromised by these airdrops.
Neon Wallet
The NEON wallet sets the standard for web wallets in terms of security and user-friendly functionality. This wallet is only designed for storing NEO, Gas, and NEP-5 tokens (Ontology, Deep Brain Chain, RPX etc.). As with all single-currency wallets, be forewarned, if you send the wrong cryptocurrency type to a wallet for which it is not designed, you will probably lose your tokens or coins. MyEtherWallet My Ether Wallet, often referred to as MEW, is the most widely used and highly regarded wallet for Ethereum and its related ERC-20 tokens. You can access your MEW account with a hardware wallet, or a different program. Or you can also get access by typing or copying in your private key. However, you should understand this method is the least safe way possible,and therefore is the most likely to result in a hack. Hardware: TrezoLedger Brief History Mechanism and Security A hardware wallet is a physical key to your on-chain wallet location, with the private keys contained within a secure sector of the device. Your private key never leaves your hardware wallet. This is one of the safest possible methods of access to your crypto assets. Many people feel like the hardware wallet strikes the right balance between security, peace of mind, and convenience. Paper Wallet Paper wallets can be generated at various websites, such as https://bitcoinpaperwallet.com/ and https://walletgenerator.net/. They enable wallet holders to store their private keys totally offline, in as secure a manner as is possible.
Real World Example — Poor Practices
MtGox Hack history effects and security considerations MtGox was the largest cryptocurrency exchange in the world before it was hacked in 2014. They were handling over 70% of BTC transactions before they were forced to liquidate their business. The biggest theft of cryptocurrency in history began when the private keys for the hot wallets were stolen in 2011 from a wallet.dat file, possibly by hacking, possibly by a rogue employee. Over the course of the next 3 years the hot wallets were emptied of approximately 650000 BTC. The hacker only needed wallet.dat file to access and make transfers from the hot wallet, as wallet encryption was only in operation from the time of the Bitcoin 0.4.0 release on Sept 23rd 2011. Even as the wallets were being emptied, the employees at Mt Gox were apparently oblivious to what was taking place. It seems that Mt Gox workers were interpreting these withdrawals as large transfers being made to more secure wallets. The former CEO of the exchange, Mark Karpeles, is currently on trial for embezzlement and faces up to 5 years in prison if found guilty. The Mt Gox hack precipitated the acceleration of security improvements on other exchanges, for wallets, and the architecture of bitcoin itself. As a rule of thumb, no small-to-medium scale crypto holders should use exchange wallets as a long-term storage solution. Investors and experienced traders may do this to take advantage of market fluctuations, but exchange wallets are perhaps the most prone to hacking, and storing assets on exchanges for an extended time is one of the riskiest ways to hold your assets.
In a case strikingly similar to the MtGox of 2011–2014, the operators of the BitGrail exchange “discovered” that approximately 17 million XRB ($195 million worth in early 2018) were missing. The operators of the exchange were inexplicably still accepting deposits, long after they knew about the hack. Then they proceeded to block withdrawals from non-EU users. And then they even requested a hard fork of the code to restore the funds. This would have meant the entire XRB Blockchain would have had to accept all transactions from their first “invalid” transaction that were invalid, and rollback the ledger. The BitGrailexchange attempted to open operations in May 2018 but was immediately forced to close by order of the Italian courts. BitGrail did not institute mandatory KYC (Know your customer) procedures for their clients until after the theft had been reported, and allegedly months after the hack was visible. They also did not have 2 factor authentication mandatory for withdrawals. All big, and very costly mistakes.
Case Study: Good Practice Binance, the Attempted Hack
During the 2017 bull run, China-based exchange Binance quickly rose to the status of biggest altcoin exchange in the world, boasting daily volumes that surged to over $4 billion per day in late December. Unfortunately, this success attracted the attention of some crafty hackers. These hackers purchased domain names that were confusingly similar to “binance.com”. And then they created sufficiently convincing replica websites so they could phish traders for their login information. After obtaining this vital info, the scammers created API keys to place large buy orders for VIAcoin, an obscure, low volume digital currency. Those large buy orders spiked VIA’s price. Within minutes they traded the artificially high-priced VIA for BTC. Then they immediately made withdrawal requests from the hacked BTC wallets to wallets outside of the exchange. Almost a perfect fait accompli! But, Binance’s “automating risk management system” kicked in, as it should, and all withdrawals were temporarily suspended, resulting in a foiled hacking attempt.
Software Wallets Web/Desktop/Phone/Exchange Advantages and Limitations
As we said before, it is inadvisable to store crypto assets in exchange wallets, and, to a lesser extent, Web Wallets. The specific reason we say that is because you need to deliver your private keys into the hands of another party, and rely on that website or exchange to keep your private key, and thus your assets, safe. The advantages of the less-secure exchange or web wallets, are the speed at which you can transfer assets into another currency, or into another exchange for sale or for arbitrage purposes. Despite the convenience factor, all software wallets will at some point have been connected to the internet or a network. So, you can never be 100% sure that your system has not been infected with malware, or some kind of keylogging software, that will allow a third party to record your passwords or private keys. How well the type of storage method limits your contact with such hazards is a good way to rate the security of said variety of wallet. Of all the software wallets, desktop and mobile wallets are the most secure because you download and store your own private key, preferably on a different system. By taking the responsibility of private key storage you can be sure that only one person has possession of it, and that is you! Thereby greatly increasing the security of your crypto assets. By having their assets in a desktop wallet, traders can guard their private key and enjoy the associated heightened security levels, as well keep their assets just one swift transfer away from an exchange.
Hardware Wallets Advantages and Limitations
We briefly touched on the features and operation of the two most popular hardware wallets currently on the market, the Ledger and Trezor wallets. Now it will be helpful to take a closer look into the pros and cons of the hardware wallet storage method. With hardware wallets, the private keys are stored within a protected area of the microcontroller, and they are prevented from being exported out of the device in plain text. They are fortified with state-of-the-art cryptography that makes them immune to computer viruses and malware. And much of the time, the software is open source, which allows user validation of the entire performance of the device. The advantages of a hardware wallet over the perhaps more secure paper wallet method of crypto storage is the interactive user experience, and also the fact that the private key must at some stage be downloaded in order to use the paper wallet. The main disadvantage of a hardware wallet is the time-consuming extra steps needed to transfer funds out of this mode of storage to an exchange, which could conceivably result in some traders missing out on profits. But with security being the main concern of the vast majority of holders, investors and traders too, this slight drawback is largely inconsequential in most situations.
Paper Wallets Advantages and Limitations
Paper wallets are thought by some to be the safest way to store your crypto assets, or more specifically, the best method of guarding the pathways to your assets on the Blockchain. By printing out your private key information, the route to your assets on the Blockchain is stored 100% offline (apart from the act of printing the private key out, the entire process is totally offline). This means that you will not run the risk of being infected with malware or become the victim of keylogging scams. The main drawback of using paper wallets is that you are in effect putting all your eggs in one basket, and if the physical document is destroyed, you will lose access to your crypto assets forever.
Key things to keep in mind about your Wallet Security: Recovery Phrases/Private Key Storage/2FA/Email Security
Recovery phrases are used to recover the on-chain location for your wallet with your assets for hardware wallets like ledgers and Trezors that have been lost. When you purchase a new ledger for example, you just have to set it up again by entering the recovery phrase into the display and the lost wallets will appear with your assets intact. Private key storage is of paramount importance to maintain the safety of your on-chain assets! This should be done in paper wallet form, or stored offline on a different computer, or USB device, from the one you would typically use to connect to the 2 Factor Authentication (2FA) sometimes known as “two step authentication”. This feature offers an extra security layer when withdrawing funds from cryptocurrency wallets. A specialized app, most commonly Google Authenticator, is synced up to the exchange to provide a constantly changing code. This code must be entered within a short time window to initiate transfers, or to log into an exchange, if it has also been enabled for that purpose.
You must always consider the level of fees, or the amount of Gas, that will be needed to carry out the transaction. In times of high network activity Gas prices can be quite high. In fact, in December 2017 network fees became so high that some Bitcoin transactions became absolutely unfeasible. But that was basically due to the anomalous network congestion caused by frantic trading of Bitcoin as it was skyrocketing in value. When copying wallet addresses, double check and triple check that they are correct. If you make a mistake and enter an incorrect address, it is most likely your funds will be irretrievably lost; you will never see those particular assets again. Also check that you haven’t input the address of another one of your wallets that is designed to hold a different variety of cryptocurrency. You would similarly run the very great risk of losing your funds forever. Or, at the very least, if you have sent the wrong crypto to a large exchange wallet, for example on Coinbase, maybe you could eventually get those funds back, but it would still entail a long and unenjoyable wait.
How to Monitor Funds
There are two ways to monitor you funds and your wallets. The first is by searching for individual wallet addresses on websites specifically designed to let you view all the transactions on a particular Blockchain. The other is to store a copy of your wallet contents on an application that tracks the prices of all cryptocurrencies. Blockchain.info is the block explorer for Bitcoin, and it allows you to track all wallet movements so you can view your holdings and all the historical transactions within the wallet. The Ethereum blockchain’s block explorer is called Ether scanner, and it functions in the same way. There is a rival to Ether scanner produced by the Jibrel Network, called JSearch which will be released soon. JSearch will aim to offer a more streamlined and faster search method for Ethereum blockchain transactions. There are many different kinds of block explorer for each individual crypto currency, including nanoexplorer.io for Nano (formerly Rai Blocks) and Neotracker for NEO. If you simply want to view the value of your portfolio, the Delta and Blockfolio apps allow you to easily do that. But they are not actually linked to your specific wallet address, they just show price movements and total value of the coins you want to monitor.
That’s not all! You can learn how to transfer and monitor the funds in and out of your wallet by clicking on the link.
To be continued!
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Backup Wallet.dat

"1) I can backup my wallet by exporting a wallet.dat file. Do I have to do this everytime I receive more BBP? Or just whenever I add a new key? 2) How do I add new keys? 3) Can I generate and see the private key so that I can write it down/print it and store it somewhere safe?" -znffal
1) think of your wallet.dat file as your passbook in a passbook savings account. You have to have that .dat file to be able to access (and prove you SHOULD have access) to the BBP stored in your account addresses. Exporting it once is all you need.
2) Adding new keys? The passphrase (password) you use is the only "key" you would have in an encrypted wallet (besides the .dat file). If you mean new addresses, you can get those by going under File and Sending (or Receving) Addresses and hit "new".
3) Clicking Encrypt Wallet will be where you choose a passphase, I don't know you can see it other than when you enter it.
To put a real world example or two.
Example One: You don't ever encrypt or backup your wallet. If I borrowed/stole/hacked your computer, I could send all your coins to my wallet (no passphrase).
Example Two: You encrypt your wallet with the passphrase "secret" but don't backup the wallet.dat file, then your computer crashes and you lose all your data. Since you didn't have a copy of the wallet.dat file, your coins would be lost.
Example Three: You backup your wallet.dat but don't encrypt it. Your computer crashes and all your data is lost, but you re-download the QT program, restore your wallet.dat, all your coins are still in you wallet. But if you lose your USB drive that has the wallet.dat on it, and I find it, I can put your wallet.dat on another computer and send all your coins to my wallet.
Example Four: You encrypt your wallet and back up the wallet.dat file. If I hack/borrow your computer, unless I guess your passphrase your coins are safe. If you computer crashes, your can restore your wallet.dat file to another computer and your coins are safe.
In short, Encrypt your wallet (passpharse) and then backup (copy) the wallet.dat file to at least two locations." -616westwarmoth
"Find your wallet.dat file, copy it to a flash drive or any other secure place. If your computer crashes, you'll always have the wallet.dat and can put it on a new machine. It will have to resync a bit when you do, but you'll never lose your "key" to the wallet. Speaking of keys, you should password protect your wallet and make sure to remember it!"
"Yes you must have a copy of the wallet.dat somewhere. So multiple back up copies are a good idea. If you lose the wallet.dat file the coins will be in limbo but there will be no way to recreate the file. One thing to remember is it doesn't matter if the wallet.dat file is "current", it can be 10 years old on a flash drive and you can download a new client, put the wallet.dat file into the machine and you'll be good." -616westwarmoth
"In addition to this, whenever you reboot the node after more than 24 hours of being synced, we back your wallet.dat up into the "backups" folder. This is useful if you ever accidentally delete your wallet.dat.
Also, if you want a paper backup, you can do a 'dumpprivkey accountaddress' command from the RPC." -Rob
"wallet is a collection of private keys"
"there are other ways to achieve high security. You can make a new wallet, encrypt it with a long password, send coins to it, put it on a flash drive and put it in cold storage, then download the hard drive cleaning program and erase the wallet.dat sectors from your PC. And of course, keep a printed copy of the private key on paper and put it in a safe. Put the usb in the safe also. Burn a cd rom with the wallet.dat file and put it in the safe." -Rob
How to safely back up your wallet https://dashpay.atlassian.net/wiki/spaces/DOC/pages/1867878/How+to+safely+back+up+your+wallet
Keep Your Crypto #SAFU (CZ's Tips) https://www.binance.com/en/blog/421499824684900429/Keep-Your-Crypto-SAFU-CZs-Tips
References: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=2042657.msg23955128#msg23955128 http://forum.biblepay.org/index.php?topic=27.0 https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=2388064.msg27797529#msg27797529
To Read: https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Wallet https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Storing_bitcoins https://bitcoin.org/en/secure-your-wallet
NOTE: As of version 1.4.3.1 we have updated to HD wallets, so you should not need to worry about keypools anymore if you have upgraded
"Regarding the Sanctuary, you receive payments always to the same address (key), so the keypool is not consumed for those payments. But when you click to generate a new address on the "Receive" tab, one key will be deducted from the keypool. Also, sometimes new addresses are automatically generated and the keypool is consumed, for example when solo mining and finding a block, a new address could be used for the block reward.
You can always check your current keypool size by typing "getwalletinfo" in the RPC console and see "keypoolsize" and "keys_left". It's only concerning if they are a low number and you plan to generate new addresses in your wallet. They start from 1000. If the number gets too low, you can just type "keypoolrefill" to refill them back to 1000 and then you should backup the wallet. But from my experience the wallet automatically refills the keypool from time to time (or after certain actions like transactions), because I see that my wallet file keeps getting larger and the "keys_left" returns to 1000.
The only issue is if you actively use your wallet on multiple computers (for example cloud mining or simply sometimes using the wallet on your laptop), then one wallet could refill the keypool with new addresses and the other one will not, or they will generate different new addresses. If I understand this correctly, for example, you could receive a payment on a new address generated in one wallet; your old balance will be there on both wallets, but only the one wallet where you generated the new address would show the new payment. Then you should copy the wallet.dat file to other computers, to update them.
If you use the wallet on just one computer, you should just backup the wallet from time to time (or when you see it has increased in size). Qt also backups wallet.dat automatically, those can be found in the folder %AppData%\BiblepayCore\backups, you will see that they also have timestamps in their names and possibly different sizes." -inblue
https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=2388064.msg27391534#msg27391534
submitted by togoshige to BiblePay [link] [comments]

How To Keep Your Cryptocurrency Safe! [Best Bitcoin Wallet ... TRUST WALLET - Secure Multi Coins Wallet Keeping your private keys secure Binance & Api Keys Tutorial Bitcoin Q&A: Binance hack, chain roll-back? Trust Wallet & Binance - The Future of Storage - YouTube The First Binance Approved Crypto Wallet – Watch to Earn Some BNB – Safepal S1 Wallet Review How secure are exchanges like Binance and Kraken?

Hackers have been trying to crack open a cryptocurrency wallet holding a treasure trove of Bitcoin worth around $700mln for more than a year. According to a report from Vice hackers have been sharing the details of the wallet which currently holds 69,370 BTC which is worth $711mln at press time. The wallet is listed in seventh place on Bitcoininfo’s list of wallets containing the largest ... Trezor was the first Bitcoin hardware wallet ever created, and it is known for its top security features which protect your BNB coins against virtual and physical theft. It is no doubt one of the best Binance Coin wallets if you are keen on having the greatest security available. Trezor is a small device with buttons and an OLED screen which can be connected to your computer via USB port. You ... Choose from 150+ supported cryptocurrencies, including Bitcoin, Ethereum, Link, Tezos, Cardano and Binance Coin. CLASS-LEADING SECURITY Security is the highest priority for us when it comes to safeguarding your funds. Your funds are protected by our Secure Asset Fund for Users (SAFU Funds). Store your crypto safely with the Binance app. A Forbes report accused Binance, the world’s largest cryptocurrency exchange, of attempting to deceive US regulators. China got its first blockchain security standard, and processed digital yuan transactions almost doubled in the last month. Bitmain closed another big sale of Antminers to the US ... Tag: Wallet.dat File The $700 Million Wallet Crack: Bitcoin's 7th Largest Address Is Under Constant Attack Sep 11, 2020 Binance is one of the biggest cryptocurrency exchanges in the world and it has recently been revealed that it is actively working on improving its compliance and data security. It is planned to achieve this goal through a new partnership with Medici Ventures portfolio company IdentityMind. In the announcement that was recently made by IdentityMind, the collaboration established between two ... Barely a month into the second quarter of 2019, over 7,000 Bitcoins have been stolen in a single transaction from Binance, the world’s largest crypto exchange. In the first large scale Bitcoin heist of the year, hackers obtained user API keys, two-factor authentication codes and other types of data through the use of phishing and viruses. Binance traced the cryptocurrency theft — more than 7,000 bitcoins at the time of writing — to a single wallet after the hackers stole the contents of the company’s bitcoin hot wallet ...

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How To Keep Your Cryptocurrency Safe! [Best Bitcoin Wallet ...

Binance Tutorial on how to get registered & set up your 2FA. In this video I also go over how to get your API Keys & set them up with the Personal bot. For more information about Arbstar 2.0 ... How secure are exchanges like Binance and Kraken? ... How to Buy Bitcoin on Binance US & Store in a Ledger Nano X - Duration: 8:36. Rex Kneisley 1,278 views. 8:36. Wie sicher sind Exchanges wie ... Trust Wallet also supports the leading crypto curencies: Bitcoin, Ethereum, ETC, GoChain, Wanchain, TRon, Litecoin, Bitcoin Cash and more. Currently more than 20,000 tokens that are built on ... Watch this video to find out my thoughts on The Safest/Best Places to Store Your Cryptocurrency! Like. Subscribe. Follow us on Twitter at: https://twitter.co... Today im going to be getting down and dirty with the Safepal S1 hardware wallet; the first device backed by Binance themselves via their Binance Labs incubator. And with that backing came on of ... Binance considered rolling back the Bitcoin chain in order to recover stolen funds. How would that have happened? How likely is it that such a recovery method would be executed in the future? Trust Wallet & Binance - The Future of Storage Today I discuss trust wallet & their integration with binance. The wallet will function with their DEX & allow... Public and private keys - how to use the former one on your daily basis and how to protect the latter against access by an unauthorized persons. Security precautions in cryptocurrency world are a ...

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